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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly 1966

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

The Three Cs: Cringe, Cry, CryThe Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Age & Scarpelli, Luciano Vincenzoni, and Leone wrote the film’s screenplay, which was based on a scenario by Vincenzoni and Leone. Additional dialogue and screenplay material were contributed by an uncredited Sergio Donati. Tonino Delli Colli served as the film’s director of photography, while Ennio Morricone wrote the score, which includes the main theme, for the picture. It was an Italian-led production with Spanish, West German, and American co-producers. The majority of the filming was done in Spain.

The movie is renowned for the cinematography by Leone, who is noted for his particular use of violence, tension, and highly stylized gunfights. In tthree gunslingers compete to find a fortune in a hidden cache of Confederate gold while taking part in numerous battles, encounters, and duels along the way.[11] The movie marked the third time Leone and Clint Eastwood worked together and their second with Lee Van Cleef.

Following For a Few Dollars More and was promoted as the third and concluding book in the Dollars Trilogy. With nearly $38 million in international box office receipts, the movie was a commercial success and is credited with launching Clint Eastwood to prominence.[12] because the spaghetti Western subgenre was not well-liked at the time, but it later won praise and was dubbed the “definitive spaghetti Western.”

Plot
Three bounty hunters confront Mexican bandit Tuco Ramirez in the American Southwest in 1862, during the American Civil War, and he kills them all before fleeing. Mercenary “Angel Eyes” questions ex-Confederate soldier Stevens in another location in search of the identity of Jackson, the soldier who stole a stockpile of Confederate gold. Stevens introduces himself as “Bill Carson,” offers to buy Angel Eyes’ cooperation, and then pulls a gun. He is killed by Angel Eyes, who also murders his own boss because he is curious about the riches. Tuco is saved by a drifter he refers to as “Blondie” from other bounty hunters. Tuco is handed over to a sheriff by Blondie, who also collects his $2,000 bounty. Blondie shoots the noose off Tuco just as he is about to be hanged, releasing him. The two split the bounty as they flee. They continue doing this in various towns up until Blondie gets tired of Tuco’s gripes and abandons him in the desert.

Blondie is forced-marched across the desert by Tuco, who is hellbent on getting retribution, after his group makes one unsuccessful attempt. Blondie eventually passes out from exhaustion. Several dead Confederate soldiers and a near-death Bill Carson come in a runaway ambulance, and in exchange for Tuco’s assistance, Carson pledges $200,000 in gold that is buried in a grave in Sad Hill Cemetery. When Tuco comes back with water, Carson is already gone. But just before he passed away, he told Blondie who was buried there. Blondie and Tuco, although being bitter rivals, come to the realisation that they must work together to unearth the gold because only Tuco is aware of the cemetery’s name and Blondie is the only one who knows whose grave needs to be dug.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Tuco brings Blondie to a neighbouring mission to get better as he poses as a Confederate soldier. There, Tuco meets up with his brother Pablo, who left his family when he was a young child to pursue a career as a priest. They have a bad meeting, and things quickly get heated.

Blondie and Tuco keep looking for the gold. Tuco shouts words in favour of the Confederacy at a distant squad of troops who later turn out to be a Union patrol. In his pursuit for Bill Carson, Angel Eyes infiltrated a prison camp as a Union sergeant, and the two are brought there. Tuco impersonates Carson and is hauled away to be interrogated. Under torture, he divulges the cemetery’s name and is then taken somewhere else to be hanged. Blondie is enlisted by Angel Eyes in his investigation because he knows he won’t reveal the name engraved on the grave. After killing an Angel Eyes henchman to avoid being hanged, Tuco enters a village that has been evacuated and finds Blondie, Angel Eyes, and his crew waiting there.

Blondie tracks down Tuco, and the two of them kill the gang, but Angel Eyes escapes. The two get caught up in a battle between the Union and the Confederacy over a vital bridge as they make their way to Sad Hill. Blondie decides to blow up the bridge in order to scatter the two armies and provide room for them to move. Tuco advises them to communicate the site of the burial with one another in case one of them perishes while they wire the bridge with explosives. Blondie claims “Arch Stanton” is the name on the headstone, and Tuco reveals the cemetery’s name. Tuco steals a horse and journeys to Sad Hill after the bridge is destroyed in order to take the gold for himself. He is being pursued by Blondie and Angel Eyes as he excavates the grave, which is empty of riches. Blondie confesses to lying about the name before setting a rock in the centre of the cemetery’s pavement where he claims the real name is inscribed.Cast
The group
‘Blondie’ (the Man with No Name), played by Clint Eastwood: To uncover hidden riches, The Good, a reserved and self-assured bounty hunter, briefly links up with Tuco and Angel Eyes. Blondie and Tuco share a conflicted relationship. Blondie and Tuco must cooperate to find the treasure because Blondie knows the name of the grave where the gold is buried but Tuco does not. Blondie’s compassion for the dying soldiers in the chaotic wreckage of the war is obvious despite her selfish goal. “I’ve never seen so many men wasted so badly,” he says. He also gives a dying soldier comfort by covering him with his coat and allowing him to enjoy a cigar. A Fistful of Dollars and For a Few Dollars More had not yet been made available in the United States when Rawhide’s run as a television series came to an end in 1966. Clint Eastwood had to be persuaded to accept the role in Leone’s upcoming picture, which was the only significant film offer he had. To convince him, Leone and his wife went to California. Two days later, he agreed to produce the movie in exchange for $250,000[13] and 10% of the revenue from North American markets, a bargain that Leone did not like.[14] He goes by “Joe” (his alias in A Fistful of Dollars) in the movie’s original Italian script, but Blondie is used in both the Italian and English dialogue.The Ugly, a quick-talking, comically oafish yet also crafty, cagey, resilient, and resourceful Mexican bandit who is sought by the authorities for a long record of crimes, is played by Eli Wallach as Tuco Benedicto Pacfico Juan Mara Ramrez (also known as “The Rat” according to Blondie). Gian Maria Volont√© (who played the antagonists in both of the earlier movies) was originally considered by the director for the part of Tuco, but he decided against it since he didn’t have the “natural comic talent” needed for the part. In the end, Leone decided on Eli Wallach because of his performance in “The Railroads” scene of the 1962 film How the West Was Won.[15] When Wallach and Leone first met in Los Angeles, Wallach expressed scepticism about taking on another role of this nature, but after seeing the For a Few Dollars More opening credits, Wallach asked, “When do you want me?”[16] The two men got along like old friends and had the same peculiar sense of humour. Leone gave Wallach the freedom to alter his character’s attire and signature movements. As soon as Eastwood and Van Cleef realised how much Leone loved the role of Tuco, the filmmaker and Wallach grew close. Wallach and Leone spoke French, which they used to converse. Tuco is the only member of the trio that the viewer learns everything about, according to Van Cleef. When we meet his brother, we learn about his upbringing and the reasons he became into a bandit. The characters of Clint and Lee, meanwhile, are yet unknown.[17] Angel Eyes and Tuco are referred to as The Ugly and The Bad, respectively, in the theatrical trailer.[18] This is due to an error in the translation; the original Italian title is “The Good [one], the Ugly [one], the Bad [one]”.
logue.[10]

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